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One popular Madison County myth claims that the village of Red House was so named when the Kentucky Central railroad was built through there. A large red brick house is said to have been directly in the path of the railroad, and the owner refused to…

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On Nov. 11, 1931, the ferry that for 132 years carried traffic across the Kentucky River at Boonesboro ceased operations. In its place a huge steel and concrete bridge opened. (Note that I am using the short version of the word rather than the longer…

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The last two Saturday Madison's Heritage columns dealt with the L&N's abandonment in 1932 of the old RNIB Railroad line which ran through Madison County. Reasons given were that the timber in Estill County and the coal around Beattyville were…

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In 1932, at the request of the owner, the L&N Railroad, the Interstate Commerce Commission in Washington examined the conditions of the 77-mile rail line that ran through Madison County via Valley View, Richmond and Brassfleld, and allowed it to…

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A headline in the October 3, 1992 issue of the Richmond Daily Register announced "Railway Line is Abandoned," something the people of Madison County already knew. The 77-mile rail-road that started at Cliffside in Franklin County and ran through…

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I knew about a lot of the ferries on the Kentucky River as it circles Madison County, but did not remember there being one at the end of Poosey Ridge. The road deadends at the river bank. However, I am now told that there used to be a ferry…

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On the last three days of the year 1921, crowds of persons continually jammed the Madison County Clerks office all day long, keeping the clerks busy throughout their working hours. What was happening? Back in the 1920's, state law had all the…

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At six o'clock on the evening of Thursday, May 22, 1924, a special L&N train pulled into the Richmond depot. From the ten Pullman cars poured out some 150 CEO's and business managers from Louisville. They were on a tour of Kentucky cities and…

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Agitation for a railroad in Madison County started soon after the end of the Civil War. In a vote taken in 1867, a proposition to raise $750,000 through the issuance of bonds and other means passed by small plurality.

Those in favor were lead by…

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Run two trains head-on into each other at 40 miles an hour? That’s no way to run a railroad, but that's exactly what happened in Madison County just a little over half a century ago.

It was about 11 o'clock on the night of March 21, 1910, when…

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A business which was surely one of the shortest-lived ever in Richmond was the Powers' Automobile Line. On March 28, 1906, Joseph Powers of Lexington arrived in Richmond to start a bus line between Richmond and Lexington. He set up shop, and that…
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