Browse Items (1881 total)

The Richmond Climax, a weekly newspaper, was a forerunner of the Richmond Daily Register, which began publishing in 1917. Here are some news items from the Climax. Jasper Castle provided this information.

“Wednesday, July 4, 1900 – White Station,…

You may have noticed the pioneer monument which stands at the southeast corner or the Madison County Courthouse. If you look at it closely, you will notice that it once was a fountain. It once sat out in the street so you could let your mule or horse…

I read a book the other day in which the main character got off the train one evening at a small town. He entered the depot and found it empty and ill-lit. The ticket window was open, but no one was in the office. This all reminded me of experiences…

I saw in the Richmond Register the other day that Union City Baptist Church would soon celebrate its 198th anniversary. The following information comes from “Conkwright’s History of Boones Creek Baptist as Given in ‘How Firm a Foundation, a History…

I had a call the other day from a man asking me about the local Odd Fellows Lodge. I told him their hall was on the upper level of the building that was once on the northeast corner of North Second and Irvine streets. There was a sign and an arrow…

Boone Tavern in Berea reopened last year after extensive remodeling. This famous landmark is named for Daniel Boone and is located in downtown Berea, along Boone’s historic Wilderness Trail from Cumberland Gap to Fort Boonesborough. Owned and…

When I was young (many years ago), South Third Street was the center of Richmond. If you arrived by bus (Greyhound or Black Brothers) at the station on the corner of Water and South Third, you were only a block away from everything.

You could…

Mrs. Frances Black recently sent me a clipping of one of my Madison’s Heritage columns, printed in the Richmond Register on November 29, 1988. She found the clipping in the desk drawer of her late husband, Raymond. I thought the column worth…

In researching the recent column on Madison High’s 1939 trip to the basketball state tournament, I read through some of the Richmond Daily Registers of that time. Here are some bits and pieces of life in Richmond in 1939.

From advertisements we…

Wellington Court was one of Richmond’s first subdivisions. It opened around 1929. If you enter from Lancaster Avenue, you are on Wellington Drive. If you take a right from this point, you are on South Wellington Drive, crossing South Third Street and…

On Aug. 29, the Tates Creek Baptist Church will celebrate 225 years of service to the community with a homecoming. The timing is inexact as the church was organized between 1783 and 1786, before Kentucky was even a state. To further add to the…

I graduated from Eastern Kentucky State College around the first of June 1951. At the same time, I finished four years of R.O.T.C. (Reserve Officer Training Corps) and was commissioned as a second lieutenant in the U.S. Army Reserve. At that time,…

With another successful re-enactment of the Battle of Richmond, we are reminded of the critical role Kentucky played in the Civil War. The war has many connections with the county beyond the August battle. Here is an article from some years ago…

This is the second in a series of columns recounting my personal recollections and memories of Eastern’s presidents going back to my entrance in Richmond in early 1930. I was born in Louisville in November of 1929, as I was a late baby and my mother…

This is the second in a series of columns recounting my personal recollections and memories of Eastern’s presidents going back to my entrance in Richmond in early 1930. I was born in Louisville in November of 1929, as I was a late baby and my mother…

I recently came across a paperback book titled “Eastern Kentucky Review 1953.” It was actually the 1953 college catalog for the then Eastern Kentucky State College. Reviewing the booklet I recognized two of the Regents, Wendell Butler, the State…

The year 1946 — unbelievably that was 64 years ago now — I was still a student at Model high. What were things like on the campus of Eastern Kentucky State Teacher’s College?

Well, Mildred Estes was Miss Eastern (with Marie Riherd and Ruth Rice as…

This article is taken from the Richmond Climax, dated May 22, 1889, as supplied by Jasper Castle.

“The Richmond cemetery goes back to about 1848, when Senator John Speed Smith obtained a charter incorporating the cemetery. Nothing more was done…

The postwar social, regulatory and economic times provided many local area students here in Madison county with a unique opportunity to pursue a college education at Eastern Kentucky State College. Not wanting to be completely cut off from home ties,…

From the Kentucky State Register for the year 1847, we learn the following details about the people and places in Madison County over 150 years ago. These first paragraphs were gleaned from some of the earliest records kept for our county, a county…

Veteran’s Day (Remembrance Day in Canada and Great Britain) is upon us once again, and my mind goes back to my own military service. I trust you will indulge me in this reminiscence.

Many Madison Countians went to the Army in 1951. I was one of…

The recent general election results triggered my memory of some county election history. With the election to the position of magistrate of Republican Greg King, the re-election of Republican Roger Barger and Billy Ray Hughes’ return to his former…

Who do you think of when you remember your days at Eastern?

Today, I will list my version of Eastern’s best known faculty — that is the ones I think of when I think of Eastern.

For me it is the faculty of 1957. I was not a student that year,…

I recently asked Jasper Castle about a place called Engle, Ky., in Estill County. Here is his answer.

“One mystery solved. In sorting through some of Mother’s stuff, I found a map showing Engle across the Kentucky River from College Hill [See map…

RICHMOND — Occasionally, we take a look at what Richmond businesses existed in a certain year. Our year this time is 1940.

Of the first group, the only store I do not personally recall is Bohon Stores. Known to me were Doc’s Restaurant, Stanifer’s…

Here are some odds and ends, not necessarily connected by a common theme or issue.

First, I present interesting items from a copy of the Richmond Daily Register of March 11, 1947. We learn the following facts: There are three movie houses in…

People occasionally ask me if I ever heard of a local band called “The Footwarmers.” I have, and in a column on local music written in 1999, provided a photograph of that group.

The group was formed by Leon (Hunky) Elder and was called “The…

This is the second article based on the social page of the Richmond Daily Register in 1936. This time we deal with a selection of weddings.

“Hurst-Vaughn

Mr. and Mrs. Ben F. Hurst announce the marriage of their daughter, Anna, to Mr. Ebre S.…

I recently read “Old Kentucky Watering Places” by Lexingtonian J. Winston Coleman Jr. It appeared originally in the Filson Club History Quarterly of January 1942. The spas were for people to partake of the curing qualities of mineral spring waters…

Many of us spent New Year’s Day watching one football game after another. When I first tuned my radio in to these events back in the 1940s, there were only five bowl games — Rose, Sugar, Orange, Cotton and Sun. Early in World War II, they moved the…

This is a second column on sports history. In the first one, we discussed football bowls and basketball. In particular, we traced Madison High’s four trips to the state basketball tournament. Less well known are the trips to the state by Red House…

This is a column about Madison County high schools over the years.

Madison Academy (for boys) began in 1814. There also was Madison Female Institute for girls. There were other private high schools in the county, including one at Kirksville and…

The late Dr. Russell Todd, a local dentist and long-time resident of Madison County, wrote a short history ofthe early days ofthe First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ). I present it for your enjoyment.

Church History for Centennial Program…

At Eastern, in the 1930 to 1950 era, there was a loud whistle which was blown to start and end classes. For example, 9 a.m. end, 9:10 start. It was located near the power plant. The campus was much smaller then and the whistle could be heard in every…

I recently read an article in the Richmond Register about Ethel Collins, age 99, of Poosey Ridge. She was a school teacher in Madison County and the article listed the chronology of schools she was associated with. She first attended Hugh School on…

This year, 2009, Americans are celebrating the 200th anniversary of the births of President Abraham Lincoln (U.S.A.) and President Jefferson Davies (C.S.A.). Both were born in Kentucky in 1809. Also born in Kentucky that same year was Christopher…

I mentioned in an earlier column about the response I received after my column about lost schools. I was told about two schools on Jacks Creek Pike (Buffalo and Forest Hill) and one on Flint Road in the College Hill area (Broom Sage). I have since…

This article presents interesting items from the 1963 manuscript, “I Remember Richmond,” written by Arthur K. Akers of Gulfport, Miss. His father was a professor at Richmond’s Central University, the Southern Presbyterian school which preceded…

What was Richmond like in the 1890s? We can glean some knowledge from a further look at Arthur K. Aker’s manuscript mentioned in earlier columns.

Under religion, Aker lists the downtown churches which I also remember — Baptist, Methodist,…

In 1991 Madison and Jessamine and Fayette counties took over the Valley View ferry. At that time Jessamine County Judge Executive Neal Cassity interviewed Ed Land, who was born in Valley View in 1916 and was raised there. The ferry originated in 1785…
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